Theme 1. Sustainable food from the sea: sustainable fisheries and aquaculture

Theme 1. Sustainable food from the sea: sustainable fisheries and aquaculture

  • Enhance the role of small-scale fisheries and small-scale aquaculture production with emphasis on environmental sustainability and social issues, rather than profitability & massive production (recall GFCM-RPOA). Foster the model of precautionary aquaculture. Enhance the capture of invasive species. Ambitious commitments for the region to revert the trend in the next year is needed. EMUNI
  • Regional agreement endorsed by Member States (competent authority of fisheries, aquaculture and finances) in line with Agenda 2030 SDGs and the work done by international and regional bodies in the region. IOC-UNESCO
  • Offshore fish-farms organized as shared infrastructures to be cross-managed among neighboured countries. CNR-INM (Italian National Reseach Council – Marine Engineering Institute)
  • The harmonisation of policies of the kind nature-based in the region. Food systems have to be analysed in all latitudes. FAO
  • cradle-to-cradle design pilots. MED JS
  • sustainable use of secure products to overcome problem of pathologies and overuse of antibiotics in aquaculturee. INSTM – Tunisia
  • We need more research and pilot projects to develop urban aquaculture, similarly to what is done for urban production on land (green roofs, vertical farming). The exploitation of urban and periurban waterfronts for aquaculture can benefit from both advanced designs of caging systems and biotechnology that enhances food production, improves health or mitigates environmental stressors (e.g. aquapods, vertical aquaculture, smart farming) .  For example, the City of Baltimore is using recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) to prevent release of waste and improve the environmental practice of net-pen aquaculture. Crucial to these systems are the microbial biofiltration systems developed to improve nitrogen removal and maximize the re-use of saltwater in the RAS. . University of Bologna
  • Promoting a better understanding of the pollution impact on economics, besides human and planet health. CNR
  • The MSP principle must be well reinforced during development. National Institute of Marine Sciences and Technologies (Tunisia)
  • 1-Establish a law to limit violations of marine wealth and follow these laws, especially in developing countries
    2-Determine the quantities caught from marine wealth and compare them every year in terms of continuity and productivity
    3-Providing financial grants for mariculture and aquaculture
    4-Sharing these projects with the private and governmental sectors in terms of support
    5-Expanding participation with neighboring countries
    6-Working to employ technological control among the countries of the Union. Ministry of Economy – Palestine
  • Convert fisheries toward offshore mariculture. University of Bologna
  • Involving local population into sustainable aquaculture. Facilitate small loans and assist the several actors to identify the potential markets.
    Encourage the R&D in this sector to innovate in new technologies, smart production methods and equipment.
    Planning for protecting coasts and oceans on any negative impact of the aquaculture and see fisheries.  AMFORHT
  • Above all, we must preserve from plastics and the dumping of toxic substances that affect marine flora and fauna.  Presa Puente Estrecho de Gibraltar, SA
  • More monitoring of marine environments, more public information on environmental impacts.  Universidade de Évora, MARE
  • Accompagner l’évolution de la situation de très proche et maintenir un contact régulier avec les autorités nationales et/ou régionales pour adopter des mesures restrictives s’ils s’avèrent nécessaires.   DynMed Alentejo – Associação para Estudos e Projectos de Desenvolvimento Regional Projectos de Dese
  • Une évaluation quantitative et qualitative (diagnostic approfondit) de ce qui existe doit avoir lieu avant toute décision stratégique. Aussi, une enquête internationale sur le sujet est nécessaire pour prendre en compte d’autres expériences en avance.  Association Tunisienne de l’Ingénierie Côtière, Portuaire et Maritime (ATIM)
  • As I said before, the application of ICT can make fisheries, aquaculture and other priorities of the blue bioeconomy, such as Marine Spatial Planning, more efficient, to carry out more circular economy processes and save energy and natural resources. In addition, this optimization would increase the benefits to the end users and improve the environment and natural resources management and governance.  UNIVERSIDAD DE MURCIA
  • ECZM protocol to ensure sustainability. Strong monitoring procedures to ensure the enforcement. Stakeholder engagement and capacity building is needed. Provide incentives for the SMEs and investment to encourage the sector to grow.  RAED – Arab Network for Environment and Development
  • Sustainability requires two pillars to focus on: economic and environmental. Economic: by developing the capacity of fisheries and aquaculture industries management to run it in most effective way and optimized approaches to achieve financial ROI with continuous growth. Environmental, will require educating the fisheries and aquaculture industries management on the vital role they have to play in order to protect their business environment represented by the sea life. They could be engaged through CSR concept. In parallel, at educational entities, junior ambassadors units to be formed / created helping in spreading the concept and the culture of environment protection. All the above can be forged / planned via entrepreneurship concept, since today we have “Private entrepreneurs” and “Social Entrepreneurs”; the latter stands for group who work for social cause / issue largely impacting the community. Thus, the whole package can be designed through “entrepreneurship concept” tailored to suit the “fisheries and aquaculture industry”.  The-Marketer.net / HOMERe Permanent Secretariat South Shore Mediterranean
  • Sustainability cannot be based exclusively on maintaining fish stocks. The sustainability and subsistence of artisanal fisheries must also be ensured and EU policy has gone 30 years in the opposite direction. Much more should be invested in promoting the consumption of their catches, the only proximity ones and Km 0, and stop promoting the consumption of species from distant and extra-Mediterranean places.Regarding the management of fish stocks, it should be based on ecosystem and polyspecific models and not extrapolate the data from 4 or 5 main species that are not representative of the more than 150 species that are caught and marketed in the Mediterranean. Necessarily, recreational fishing must be included in these models.Finally, Atlantic-specific management instruments, such as Individual Transferable Quotas, the obligation to land discards or the prohibition of polyspecific commercial categories, must be eliminated as they are contrary to the subsistence of artisanal fishing in the Mediterranean.  Direcció General de Pesca i Medi Marí. Govern de les Illes Balears (Spain)
  • We consider the following actions to be priority for the sustainability of the fisheries and aquaculture sector:-           Ensure the rights of small-scale fishermen, making sure that the quota system allows for fair allocations to short-distance fleets.-           Ensuring cooperation amongst Mediterranean countries to set quotas and fisheries management measures that are fair to all countries and respect environmental boundaries.-           Implement the ecosystem approach to fisheries management.-           Appropriate marine spatial planning that takes into account sensitive habitats (such as deep-water coral reefs, coralligenous assemblages, Posidonia meadows, and other nursery habitats for commercial species) as well as allowing enough protected habitats to allow for spill-over effects.-           Step up efforts for the expansion of the Natura2000 network into the marine environment, and the designation of new MPAs (marine protected areas).-           Reinforce monitoring and law enforcement in Mediterranean waters regarding fishing activities, and step up efforts against IUU (illegal, unreported, and unregulated) fishing.-           Develop harmonised standards relating to the circular design of fishing gear to encourage preparation for re-use and facilitate recyclability at the end-of-life.-           Invest in R&D for the development of new kinds of fish-feed for aquaculture that do not use other fish products as a source (i.e.: insect-based, plant-based fish feeds), more selective fishing gears, and non-destructive fishing methods, as well as for valorization of bycatch.

    –           Step up fleet-reduction incentives in order to have a smaller but year-round active fishing fleet, as well as incentives for aquaculture development.  Mediterranean Information Office for Environment, Culture and Sustainable Development (MIO-ECSDE)

  • Promotion of the activities that this industry does and the benefits that provides to society, giving numbers, data to the population. Promotion between young people at Universities and Schools to assure that current and future generations understand the importance of the industry and are aware of the job opportunities that it provides. Implement a scientific program which can provide general and specific data over fisheries and aquaculture relevancy.  ECONCRETE
  • • To promote dissemination, transfer and uptake of solutions and innovative tools for measuring and enhancing resource efficiency
    • To promote investments to support SMEs in responding to the growing customer demands for sustainable products and services by investing in eco-innovation and resource efficiency along the value chain
    • To address users’ perceptions and to raise awareness among citizens to promote sustainable consumption patterns
    • To put in place policy and legislation to promote resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and production patterns
    • To implement the Product Environmental Footprint method across the agro-food systems with the aim of greening the supply chain, including a higher resource efficiency and the decrease of environmental impacts
    • To limit the production of organic and inorganic waste in the agrofood sector by applying innovative technologies
    • To optimise the use of bio-based packaging materials
    • To endorse horizontal and quadruple helix approaches and cooperation among stakeholders in forthcoming initiatives as a key to achieving circular agro-food systems.   BETA Tech Center, UVic/UCC – Interreg MED Green Growth
  • Nous recommandons de considérer les actions proposées dans le cadre du Document Stratégique de Façade adopté le 04 octobre 2019 (cf. objectifs socio-économiques, indicateurs et cibles, notamment M. et N) > http://www.dirm.mediterranee.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/la-strategie-de-facade-maritime-est-adoptee-a2892.html  .   wpd offshore France
  • Educate and train policymakers in countries first. Nurture a culture of co-design with stakeholders and scientists.  METU Institute of Marine Sciences
  • Facilitating/supporting the transferring of the FLAG mechanisms -Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAGs) as partnerships between fisheries actors and other local private and public stakeholders- outside the EU to reach all the Mediterranean.  Those shall be linked to local economic development mechanisms, while promoting circularity.
    Supporting SMEs all through the value change in engaging in circular economy approaches with initiatives as the Interreg MED Project BLUEFASMA applied to a basin wide scale.
    States and public administrations have to put all the efforts in assuring the fulfillment of the rules upon seizes, species and fishing-excluded zones and periods.
    Tax policies must be created in order to favor/enhance the transition to new forms of fishing among companies.
    Increasing the number of Marine Protected Areas and the assurance of their implementation and management.
    Boosting covenants among public administrations and sustainable fishing companies.
    Boosting aquaculture by taxing policies upon both producers and consumers.
    Make the general public take notice of the sustainable companies that exist in the markets.   MedCities
  • Trainning and financing instruments.   Fundacion Valenciaport
  • Ensure that all the activities do not diminish natural capital stocks and do not add pollutants.   University of Siena
  • 1) Consumer oriented actions:
    • Exchange best practices and dissemination among Mediterranean countries on Sustainable Food Consumption concept and good food practices for society (e.g. reduce consumption and tourism food waste, co-design new strategies to preserve and freeze products) leading to improved society behaviours and better consumer practices;
    • Promote fishing and aquaculture eco-label products;
    2) Governance and capacity building:
    • Develop innovative methods and tools for monitoring and governing Mediterranean aquaculture and fisheries, in line with existing policies.
    • Develop capacity building activity focusing on artisanal fisheries;
    3) Innovative assessment and management:
    • Improve adaptive planning and management scenarios by defining approaches and tools to identify the trade-offs between ecological dynamics and socio-economic needs, taking into account marine ecosystems goods and services and their environmental, economic and social value;
    • The Mediterranean way for Aquaculture: (i) study and evaluate the best processes to adapt and diversify aquaculture activities (species and systems) and capacities in a changing environment, including for small and medium-scale farms; (ii) develop new management tools and ecosystem-based approach, tackling pathogens, (iii) develop conceptual models for Integrated MultiTrophic Aquaculture (IMTA);
    • Assess Fish Stocks in a holistic frame taking into account climate change (and alien species diffusion);
    • Rethink the approach to the management of by-products and by-catch from fisheries and aquaculture in the production chain.   National Research Council of Italy
  • – Promote sustainable fishing techniques, particularly more selective and low impact gear and practices. Increase investments in those gears and practices to reduce bycatch and onboard sorting costs and create specialized manufacturing jobs
    – Support small scale fisheries by implementing co-management initiatives to achieve sustainable fisheries and compliance and support fishing communities by providing alternative livelihoods that can diversify fisher’s revenue streams (pesca tourism etc.)
    – Adopt spatial and temporal closures, particularly for nursery areas, to allow for fish stocks to recover
    – Mediterranean States must strengthen compliance mechanisms within regional organisations (Regional Fisheries Management Organisations and Regional Seas Conventions) with binding commitments and infringement procedures to increase the accountability of Contracting Parties
    – Governments should increase investments in public research on sustainable aquaculture to support businesses in progressively enhancing sustainability and production efficiency.   WWF
  • Reduce pollution. Reduce plastic is definitely on the forefront to achieve this goal.  Malta Maritime Forum
  • To ensure Mediterranean fisheries to become sustainable, effort must be put in particular on  Marine protected areas and in particular on no-take zones. Indeed, MPAs, when they are effectively managed and with a sufficient part of fully protected zones (no-take/ no-fishing zones) are tools that can play a very crucial role in protecting key habitats for fish and supporting the “reserve effect”.
    Co-management of fisheries is also essential by bringing together decision-makers, authorities and fishermen to take decision regarding fisheries management.
    Regarding aquaculture, please see the recommendations from the Pharos4MPAs Interreg project (coordinated by WWF): https://pharos4mpas.interreg-med.eu/fileadmin/user_upload/Sites/Biodiversity_Protection/Projects/PHAROS4MPAs/AQUACULTURE_31july_single_page.pdf.  MedPAN, the Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas Network
  • – Fisheries & aquaculture shall implement the circular economy principles in order to lead and renew this blue growth sector to a more sustainable growth.
    – Funding opportunities are essential for sustainable innovation investments in the sector, which gathers many SMEs;
    – Common strategies related to fisheries and aquaculture in the Mediterranean shall be reached, including countries from all shores of the basin. To this end, existing clusters in the Mediterranean region should be empowered and involved in.
    – Maritime Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal Zone Management shall include zones for coastal fisheries, for offshore aquaculture and other activities related to the fishing sector (e.g. recreational fishing).
    – The efficient use of waste and by-products in fisheries & aquaculture sector is not only an environmental issue but also an economic one.
    – Vocational education is also essential in this sector, as well as lifelong learning (e.g. in the form of living labs). It shall be implemented in coastal and insular areas where a big part of the population is involved in this activity.
    – Populations should be better informed on the provenance of the products they consume, as well as be made more aware about the benefits of a sound consumption for the maintaining of stocks.  Med Blue Growth community
  • Mediterranean fisheries and aquaculture should be monitored and regulated to avoid negative environmental impacts, respect ecological carrying capacity and insure fair revenues to fishermen and SMEs.  eco-union
  • In this regard, any taken action should be fishermen-oriented. Fishermen are the backbone of sustainable fishing. Raising awareness among fishermen about the sustainable fishing benefits, not only to the marine ecosystem, but for their own catch (in quantity and quality), and how it becomes durable to sustain their own livelihood, guarantees the adoption and success of sustainable fishing practices. Also, given that most fishermen are among the most vulnerable and the poorest society members, alternative and/or complementary income-generating activities should be sought or taught to fishermen, as a support means during fishing low season (e.g. involving fishermen in sea-bottom cleaning activities by training them on diving to exert it; Or, Capacity building on fish- preserving during the market low season, to be able to sell during the market high season…. and other income generating activities). Finally, creating and supporting existing fishermen Coops could help in adopting sustainable fishing endeavors.  Green Community NGO
  • Faire intervenir les pêcheurs artisanaux (et/ou leur représentant locaux, comité des pêches) dans le renouvellement de leur ressources en favorisant les actions de repeuplements. C’est ce que nous réalisons actuellement dans deux projets en cours (ORREA à Toulon et CASCIOMAR à Marseille).  ECOCEAN
  • -Informer, former et sensibiliser les acteurs (responsables d’usines, les pécheurs et les consommateurs) sur le respect de l’environnement, la qualité du poisson à pecher;
    -Conscientiser les pecheurs sur les dangers liés dechets qu’ils jettent dans la mer.  Assistance Communautaire et Développement (ASCOM)
  • Sensibilisation des pecheurs / Renforcer la connaissance scientifique de l’état des ressources halieutiques.  Agence nationale des ports Maroc
  • 75% de la population mondiale s’installe prés des côtes et principalement dans les capitales côtières qui hébergeront près de 6 milliards de citoyens d’ici à 2050. Il est évident que les solutions de “off-shore farming” sont obligatoires pour ces mégapoles côtières qui ne pourront plus compter sur les terres pour subvenir aux besoins.
    Le off-shore farming / vertical farming, combiné avec l’aquaponie 2.0 doit s’organiser (smart farming & fishery).
    Nous préconisons l’installation de “farm factories off-shore” issues du recyclage de vieux navires cargo et installer en ZEE (post 12 miles des côtes).
    Une production locale, organique, autosuffisante et combinée, en atmosphère contrôlée.
    La production doit être ensuite connectée à un réseau de “short shipping” décarboné (LNG ou hydrogène) qui récupère la marchandise directement auprès des fermes flottantes et les achemine en cœur des villes côtières, sans transport terrestre. Ces short-shippers doivent aussi servir de place de marché locaux, afin d’éliminer les intermédiaires et contrôler la chaine de distribution en évitant la manipulation et d’emballage: “direct farm to customers”.
    Cela permettra de réduire le coût pour le consommateur, tout en augmentant la qualité des produits frais et organiques.
    Ce short shipping/place de marché flottante permettra aussi d’apporter un dynamisme pour les petits ports qui pourront aussi accueillir ces nouvelles activités.
    Il faut connecter ces initiatives aux autorités locales car les ZEE sont réglementées et nécessitent l’obtention d’un accord préalable. De plus, il serait utile de considérer une fiscalité attractive (charges sociale et impositions, douane et TVA…) pour ses fermes en ZEE à plus de 12 miles des côtes.   NOAH ReGen
  • -L’application stricte des conventions pertinentes en vigueur de lutte contre la pollution marine (convention internationales et régionale à l’instar de la convention de Barcelone)
    -Renforcement des capacités et transfert des compétences, d’expert et d’expertise entre entre les pays du nord et les pays du sud de la méditerranée
    -La mise en œuvre effective de l’annexe VI da la convention Marpol 73-78.  IMFMM
  • – Mise en place de plans d’aménagement des différentes pêcheries, basés sur l’approche écosystémique, tenant compte de l’économique, le social, l’écologique et environnemental, etc.
    – Renforcer le contrôle des mesures de gestion prévues dans ces plans d’aménagement
    – Impliquer les communautés concernés dans la prise de décision,
    – Considérer la recherche scientifique intégrée (biologie, écologie et socio économie) comme un axe principal dans la mise en place des différentes stratégies
    – Mise en place de plan d’aménagement spécifique à l’aquaculture, en favorisant l’aquaculture à petite échelle
    – Améliorer les circuits de commercialisation, visant davantage la valorisation des produits de la mer et à des prix abordables.
    – Tous les gens de la mer devront être inscrits dans la sécurité sociale.  Institut National de Recherche Halieutique
  • – Mise en place d’une gouvernance de pêche socialement et économiquement équitable et responsable ;
    – Mise en place de plan de gestion des pêcheries fondé sur des avis scientifiques ;
    – Encourager la certification écologique ;
    – Réduire l’effort de pêche ;
    – Favoriser la traçabilité des produits de la pêche ;
    – Lutter contre la pêche illégale, non déclarée et non réglementée;
    – Interdire les rejets en mer;
    – Favoriser l’utilisation d’engins de pêche durable;
    – Soutenir la mise en place de la planification spatiale maritime axée sur une approche écosystémique /zone;
    – Transition vers  une économie circulaire basée sur de l’innovation ;
    – Mettre en place un réseau d’AMPs connectés ;
    – Mettre en œuvre les directives de la FAO sur la pêche artisanale;
    – Accélérer la mise en œuvre des cibles de l’ODD14.
    – Mise en place de plan de prévention et de gestion des espèces exotiques envahissantes
    – diversification des revenus des pêcheurs par mise en place d’activités génératrices de revenus.  Département de la Pêche Maritime
  • Several major shifts are necessary to ensure a transition towards sustainable Mediterranean fisheries as well as a sustainable seafood consumption by Mediterranean residents. First of all, measures on the sustainability of food production side must be coupled with measures dealing with sustainable food choices from consumers. This means that, from the production side, there is a need to financially support regional fisheries in the process of certification so that more producers can actually secure a sustainable seafood supply. Similarly, financial support is necessary for small scale fisheries so that their products can see an increase in their market penetration. Support of Small Scale Fisheries (SSF) can then also contribute to increase in job creation. In line with this, no take zones might be necessary as well as the banning of certain environmentally harmful fishing practices and gears. Co-management practices in MPAs (between fishermen and the management authority) also needs being strengthened.
    On the other side of the coin, and realizing that most of the Mediterranean residents demand for seafood insists on a limited number of fish and seafood species, thus causing excessive pressure on certain fish stocks, a need is felt to favor diversification of the baskets of fishes and seafood being consumed by Mediterranean residents. Such diversification could positively contribute to generating a market for fish species that usually gets discarded because of perceived no commercial value, thus contributing to reduction in food waste. This could be achieved through regional awareness campaigns as well as national dietary guidelines.  Global Footprint Network
  • Development of compliance standards and targets for sustainable fishing of
    Mediterranean.New spatial management tools to support decision making processes such as e.g. evaluating conflicts and synergies, single and cumulative impacts, scenario building and analysis, evaluating suitability for specific uses; Promoting integration of MPA in MSP processes and coastal management.  National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries
  •  Using new tools for sustainability of the aquaculture sector:
    1- Elaboration of Carrying capacity models and using remote sensing tool in aquaculture within the context of spatial planning for it’s efficient insertion and social acceptability”
    2- improving fish feed and feed mangment using last advanced technology
    3- implementation of biosecurty in aquaculture production systems
    reas.  INSTM
  • To promote offshore aquaculture, Recirculated aquaculture systems and low impact species aquaculture to decrease the global environmental impact of aquaculture
    To promote research on health and welfare
    To improve feasibility of companies by promoting breeding techniques, fast growing species aquaculture and synergies with another industries
    To anticipate climate change by researching on resilience ability of cultured species.  Spanish Institute of Oceanography
  • Protection of susceptible species and habitats, maintenance of all types of species at acceptable levels, use of selective fishing methods, maintenance of biodiversity, reduction of energy and chemical products used, social, and economic responsibility and justice and the awareness of the origin of catches at all times throughout the chain.
    Promotion of “responsible buying”.
    The transition towards a sustainable fisheries model will improve the situation of vulnerability that currently exists in fishing communities, by contributing more employment to the fishing sector, more employment to other activities related to leisure and tourism
    services and more employment opportunities for young people, women, and people with medium and high qualifications.  Regional Cluster “North-East”
  • There has to be common rules for all Med countries to make the “playing field” the same. It is essential to keep the engagement with companies through RDI projects to provide the tools and guidance and change the mind-set towards circular. The field of aquaculture is still fragmented and dissociated from all the other sectors that make up the “circle”. Realistic goals for sustainability at the different parts of the the circle need to be established as the current sustainability status is quite different. The goals should be built as short, medium and long. The demands for the blue economy and sustainability should take into account the relative “youth” of this are relative to terrestrial farming that has been developing under very different scenarios over hundreds of years. The unique characteristics of the food from the sea should be acknowledged and the need for much more RD&I and stimulus for the industry, supply, product development and actions for public acceptance cannot be overstated.  Centro de Ciências do Mar, Universidade do Algarve
  • Afin de garantir l’alimentation durable à partir de la mer moyennant la pêche et l’aquaculture, une gestion durable des ces activités est cruciale.  A cet effet, et puisque tout plan de gestion repose sur les résultats des études scientifique en la matière, l’importance de la recherche halieutique pour atteindre les objectifs est incontournable.
    Certaines actions sont jugées importantes en matière de recherche et d’expertise scientifiques et techniques dans les domaines de la pêche et de l’aquaculture :
    Ø POUR LA PECHE :
    Action 1 : La mise en place un système de traçabilité des produits de la pêche à travers l’identification correcte des espèces pêchées et la quantification précise des captures de pêche et des rejets en mer pour une meilleure évaluation des stocks. En effet, et jusqu’à présent, un grand nombre d’espèces sont mal identifiées ou bien plusieurs espèces sont désignées sous une même appellation commune ; une part non négligeable des captures n’est pas déclarée et passe par le circuit informel sans aucun contrôle ; et les rejets des captures de pêche ne sont pas spécifiquement identifiés et évalués.
    Action 2 : Evaluation de la sensibilité des écosystèmes marins par rapport aux différentes pressions pour une gestion efficace du milieu marin. Ce ci permettra d’évaluer les risques d’impact liés aux différentes activités par la cartographie de la sensibilité des habitats, et la mise en évidence des habitats et/ou les pressions pour lesquels les données et connaissances sont limitées, pour mieux orienter les futurs projets de recherche.
    Action 3 : Établir des diagnostics sur l’état des stocks des ressources halieutiques, déterminer leurs niveaux d’exploitation biologique et étudier les facteurs qui régissent leur évolution.
    Action 4 : Favoriser la création des Aires Marines Protégées pour assurer la protection durable des ressources naturelles et culturelles. En effet, ces AMP constituent des niches écologiques pour la protection de la biodiversité en assurant la durabilité des ressources halieutiques.
    Action 5 : Evaluation de l’impact des changement climatiques et de la pollution par les déchets marins sur les écosystèmes marins. En effet, l’impact des changements climatiques et de l’utilisation intensive et non contrôlée des déchets est actuellement visible sur toute la méditerranée et les problématiques engendrées sont d’ordre écologique, économique et social. A cet effet, l’étude de l’impact de ces facteurs sur les ecosystèmes est devenu une nécessité pour la préservation des ressources et la durabilité des activités de pêche.
    Ø POUR L’AQUACULTURE :
    Action 1 : Mise en place des infrastructures de recherche dédiées à l’aquaculture
    Action 2 : Identification, évaluation des potentialités et suivi du fonctionnement des sites aquacoles et contribution à l’élaboration des plans d’aménagements
    Action 3 : Suivi environnemental et classement sanitaire et zoo-sanitaire des zones conchylicoles
    Action 4 : Conduite des travaux de Recherche, Développement et Innovation (RDI) en matière de Technologie et l’Ingénierie Aquacole (techniques), en termes de la Zootechnie (espèces) et de nutrition (aliments)
    Action 5 :  Valorisation des produits et coproduits issus d’aquaculture.  Institut National de Recherche Halieutique (INRH)
  • Améliorer les installations  portuaires pour faciliter la gestion adéquate des déchets, réduire la charge polluante des eaux usées, réduire les impacts environnement liés à la réparation des navires et des engins de pêche.- Prévoir une aide au renouvellement des flottes en remplaçant les vieux embarcations de pêche par des embarcations plus efficaces sur le plan énergétique.- Encourager le développement de programmes de certification de la pêche durable.- Développer des programmes de recherche et de développement pour obtenir des engins de pêche plus sélectifs.

    – Développer des programmes de recherche et de développement pour tirer part des technologies de communication afin d’optimiser les mouvements des navires de pêche

    – Mener des campagnes de sensibilisation et d’information sur les bonnes pratiques environnementales à l’intention des entreprises du secteur de la pêche et de l’aquaculture, situées dans les zones portuaires, afin de: réduire la consommation d’énergie, réduire la consommation d’eau, réduire les rejets polluants dans la mer, réduire la quantité de déchets produits, améliorer la gestion des déchets, réduire les émissions polluantes dans l’atmosphère.

    – Mener des campagnes de sensibilisation à l’environnement et informer les navires de pêche sur les bonnes pratiques environnementales: réduire la consommation d’énergie, réduire les rejets polluants en mer, réduire la quantité de déchets produits, améliorer la gestion des déchets, réduire les émissions polluantes dans l’atmosphère.

    – Promouvoir la mise en œuvre de systèmes de gestion environnementale dans les entreprises de pêche et d’aquaculture.  Starfish

  • The actions to ensure sustainable Mediterranean fisheries and aquaculture are the control in using the sustainable tools by fishermen and make sure that the Governments are implementing the fishery law and the fishermen respect the period of fishing.  Lebanese University – Green Community
  • Développement du transport maritime dans le respect de l’environnement maritime pour lutter contre la pollution maritime et environnemental gg2.
    Développement du tourisme solidaire et côtier.  Conseil de la Région de l’Oriental
  • • Fishing in the Mediterranean on the European coasts has been considerably reduced in recent years, and in particular this reduction in numbers has resulted in a reduction in the fishing fleet on the coasts of the Western Adriatic of around 60% fewer vessels than those present and operational 15 years ago.
    • However, this reduction has not fully brought about all the expected benefits, and fishermen still complain of a reduction in certain fish stocks.
    • These difficulties are probably changing more attributable to the reasons of climate change and non-organic sources of pollution than to fishing efforts.
    • This means that a policy of containment of fishing effort is completely ineffective in reducing the number of vessels, without taking into account other important factors affecting fish stocks.
    • In particular, the environmental policy that led to the installation of wastewater treatment plants in all the major cities of the Adriatic has not taken into account the eutrophic aspects of organic inputs, which, if in the past were exaggerated, are currently too rare and have made the risk oligotrophic Adriatic, with serious damage to the breeding of molluscs and crustaceans which is, for this region, the main aquaculture activity.
    • With regard to fishing, however, it is necessary and appropriate to orient policies towards a greater focus on the policies of brands and labels which identify the traceability of the product, in particular if it is accompanied by dissemination policy which lead to greater local consumption of the captured product in order to facilitate the reduction of passages and to make the supply chain as short as possible. It is therefore above all aquaculture products which will have to play this role for the processing industry formerly played by wild fish.
    • Aquaculture also needs new impetus from European policies by identifying standard sustainable production systems and intervention in Member States which make it less difficult and bureaucratic to set up farms, especially in continental areas.
    • All this is absolutely necessary, accompanied by a bonus for processing companies using livestock products from their areas of establishment and, above all, accompanied by a credit support policy which makes these investments attractive.
    • Farmed and caught fish products are also the greatest resource of animal protein which can be obtained at much lower cost than those from other animal sources.
    • Only in this way it will be possible to recover part of the jobs lost by the reduction in the fishing fleet and to better develop the breeding of quality fish products thanks to a policy of support for all these agricultural systems, not very environmental-friendly which are above all oriented towards a lesser use of drugs.
    • In particular, it is underlined in this sector how extremely important are the European territorial cooperation policies which, through the financing of INTERREG projects, have allowed the exchange of knowledge and good practices and the construction of various hypotheses of district governance, i.e. areas homogeneous seas or lagoons both from the point of view of shared fish resources and for the social and economic similarity of coastal populations.
    • In this context, the experience of the Northern Adriatic fishing district and the Adrifish, Adriblu, Ecosea, Dory, AdriSmartFish and Prizefish projects are highlighted, which through the participation of many regional administrations and many Italian marine Adriatic research centers, Slovenians, Croats, Montenegrins and Albanians have allowed the creation of a large community still engaged in the search for shared governance solutions for the sustainable management of marine fish resources but also for innovative eco-compatible aquaculture systems.
    • Finally, it is absolutely important that the European Commission and Parliament continue the policy of structural financial subsidies for fisheries and aquaculture production and service companies, through the EMFF, which, however, must necessarily be made simpler and more effective in its mechanisms, financial and bureaucratic, also providing measures and mechanisms tailored in a more compatible way with the Mediterranean marine conditions, ichthyic resources specificities and sector operators realities.
    In particular, concerning the EMFF stream of funding, showing big problems related to its implementation impacting the Mediterranean/Adriatic Sea areas (as well as other EU sea basins), in many ways, Emilia-Romagna Region together and in collaboration with other Regions and local authorities located in the Northern Adriatic and Mediterranean sea basins, is claiming for new rules, starting from a more proper management set of rules in the EMFF funding (which is the sole within the ESI Funds not to be programmed at a regional level, thus lacking of the local and regional dimension), and continuing with more adapted measures supported by other financial sources / programs (ex. ETC funding or Research funding) also to comply with the requirement of better policy integration.  CPRM
  • Garantir le respect et l’application d’une manière intégrale les cahiers de charges.  ASSOCIATION DE PROTECTION DU LITTORAL A MAAMOURA – APLM
  • Les pisciculteurs revendiquent pleinement une mission d’offrir aux consommateurs le poisson qu’ils désirent, dans le respect de l’environnement, du bien-être animal et de l’homme. Il faut s’engager un dialogue avec tous les acteurs (professionnels, ministères de tutelle, scientifiques…) sur la base du développement durable pour être conscients des responsabilités ainsi de tracer un plan qui vise à prévenir ou à éliminer les surcapacités qui menacent la conservation et l’utilisation durable des ressources
    Les actions stratégiques de la gouvernance en matière de pêche et d’aquaculture sont :
    Assurer la gestion durable de la pêche et de l’aquaculture et la viabilité des pêcheries
    Satisfaire la demande régionale en produits halieutiques
    Développer la pêche continentale dans les zones hydro-géographiques favorables
    Améliorer et moderniser les conditions d’exercice de la pêche artisanale
    Renforcer la coopération sous régionale
    Améliorer les conditions de la transformation artisanale
    Promouvoir la recherche et le développement de produits à plus forte valeur ajoutée
    Sensibiliser et former l’ensemble des professionnels
    Décourager l’exportation de produits entiers congelés
    Développer un système durable de financement de la pêche artisanale maritime et continentale
    Renforcer la coopération bilatérale, sous régionale, multilatérale et internationale durable et avantageuse en matière de pêche et d’aquaculture.  cedar organization Algeria
  • Maintenir des tables d´échange et de négociation permanente entre acteurs de la filière et partager les données et enjeux dans un observatoire commun.  eurorégion Pyrénés Méditerranée
  • Faire du plaidoyer pour lutter contre la surexploitation des ressources halieutiques.
    Établir des normes et des mesures correctives pour diminuer l’impact des débris marins sur les ressources halieutiques
    Nouer des relation avec les OSC pour mettre en place des projets de sensibilisation  sur le nettoyage des plages.  ONG ASSISTANCE COMMUNAUTAIRE et développement ASCOM
  • Offrir des ports performants avec les meilleures conditions de débarquements des produits de la pêche.  DIRECTION DES PORTS ET DU DOMAINE PUBLIC MARITIME
  • Promoting the development on innovative technologies that can be deployed at the fish farms and allow the fish farmers to reduce the waste produced by the activity (e.g. non-eaten food, dead fish, etc.) in order to minimise the environmental impacts.  CTN – Marine Technology Centre
  • The uncontrolled increase in fishing effort in many Mediterranean areas has led to chronic overfishing. So, effort reductions to control fishing mortalities, the adherence to the scientific advice, and effective implementation of national management plans would be the first steps to put in place.
    Furthermore the damage done by overfishing goes beyond the marine environment. A cross work with all relevant stakeholders to reform fisheries management globally, focusing on sustainable practices that not only conserve ecosystems, but also sustain livelihoods and ensure food security would be needed.
    The national and sub-national control and enforcement systems are generally weak. Poor controls and enforcement are translated into a low level of compliance with fisheries regulations. It would be important to challenge the Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU), which seriously undermines sustainable fishery management objectives.
    Regarding the lack of transparency, it should be important to promote the Fishing Authorisation Regulation standards and transparency on access agreements. Then, the increasing cooperation between the EU and non-EU countries to reinforce fisheries monitoring, control and surveillance systems to secure sustainable and transparent fishing practices need to be reinforced. An important tool to ensure high quality fishery products could be the implementation of eco-labelling standards, consistent with the international FAO requirements.
    Finally, we must promote a culture of responsibility, accountability and compliance among fishery stakeholders by increasing public awareness as an essential step towards making fisheries sustainable. The promotion and exchange of best practices could contribute to achieve results in that sense.  Legambiente Onlus
  • Open sea aquaculture structures can be use as bases where deploy oceanographic instrumentation. In that way we will: decrease the deployment cost, increase the safety of the instrumentation, obtained long time series data, retrieve an information useful for the aquaculture. In order to do so, aquaculture companies should stablish collaboration with oceanographic research institutions.  Cartagena Oceanographic Research Institute
  • Improve the environmental impact studies related with the impact of the open sea fish farming on the water column due to increase of nutrients from the fish disposals.
    Phytoplankton are the marine organism that offer higher potential for blue biotechnology, such as providing primary compounds for the pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. We need to be able to develop new methods to aquaculture it on large scales in a sustainable and secure way.  Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena
  • • Fishing in the Mediterranean on the European coasts has been considerably reduced in recent years, and in particular this reduction in numbers has resulted in a reduction in the fishing fleet on the coasts of the Western Adriatic of around 60% fewer vessels than those present and operational 15 years ago.
    • However, this reduction has not fully brought about all the expected benefits, and fishermen still complain of a reduction in certain fish stocks.
    • These difficulties are probably changing more attributable to the reasons of climate change and non-organic sources of pollution than to fishing efforts.
    • This means that a policy of containment of fishing effort is completely ineffective in reducing the number of vessels, without taking into account other important factors affecting fish stocks.
    • In particular, the environmental policy that led to the installation of wastewater treatment plants in all the major cities of the Adriatic has not taken into account the eutrophic aspects of organic inputs, which, if in the past were exaggerated, are currently too rare and have made the risk oligotrophic Adriatic, with serious damage to the breeding of mollusks and crustaceans which is, for this region, the main aquaculture activity.
    • With regard to fishing, however, it is necessary and appropriate to orient policies towards a greater focus on the policies of brands and labels which identify the traceability of the product, in particular if it is accompanied by dissemination policy which lead to greater local consumption of the captured product in order to facilitate the reduction of passages and to make the supply chain as short as possible. It is therefore above all aquaculture products which will have to play this role for the processing industry formerly played by wild fish.
    • Aquaculture also needs new impetus from European policies by identifying standard sustainable production systems and intervention in Member States which make it less difficult and bureaucratic to set up farms, especially in continental areas.
    • All this is absolutely necessary, accompanied by a bonus for processing companies using livestock products from their areas of establishment and, above all, accompanied by a credit support policy which makes these investments attractive.
    • Farmed and caught fish products are also the greatest resource of animal protein which can be obtained at much lower cost than those from other animal sources.
    • Only in this way it will be possible to recover part of the jobs lost by the reduction in the fishing fleet and to better develop the breeding of quality fish products thanks to a policy of support for all these agricultural systems, not very environmental-friendly which are above all oriented towards a lesser use of drugs.
    • In particular, it is underlined in this sector how extremely important are the European territorial cooperation policies which, through the financing of INTERREG projects, have allowed the exchange of knowledge and good practices and the construction of various hypotheses of district governance, i.e. areas homogeneous seas or lagoons both from the point of view of shared fish resources and for the social and economic similarity of coastal populations.
    • In this context, the experience of the Northern Adriatic fishing district and the Adrifish, Adriblu, Ecosea, Dory, AdriSmartFish and Prizefish projects are highlighted, which through the participation of many regional administrations and many Italian marine Adriatic research centers, Slovenians, Croats, Montenegrins and Albanians have allowed the creation of a large community still engaged in the search for shared governance solutions for the sustainable management of marine fish resources but also for innovative eco-compatible aquaculture systems.
    • Finally, it is absolutely important that the European Commission and Parliament continue the policy of structural financial subsidies for fisheries and aquaculture production and service companies, through the EMFF, which, however, must necessarily be made simpler and more effective in its mechanisms, financial and bureaucratic, also providing measures and mechanisms tailored in a more compatible way with the Mediterranean marine conditions, ichthyic resources specificities and sector operators realities.
    • In particular, concerning the EMFF stream of funding, showing big problems related to its implementation impacting the Mediterranean/Adriatic Sea areas (as well as other EU sea basins), in many ways, Emilia-Romagna Region together and in collaboration with other Regions and local authorities located in the Northern Adriatic and Mediterranean sea basins, is claiming for new rules, starting from a more proper management set of rules in the EMFF funding (which is the sole within the ESI Funds not to be programmed at a regional level, thus lacking of the local and regional dimension), and continuing with more adapted measures supported by other financial sources / programs (ex. ETC funding or Research funding) also to comply with the requirement of better policy integration.  Emilia-Romagna Region
  • It is critical to ensure a sustainable management and use of natural resources. This should be based on an ecosystem-based management approach, understanding the reciprocities between natural resources on the one hand and the needs for economic growth on the other.The Interreg Med Biodiversity protection community (https://backend.interreg-med.eu/fileadmin/user_upload/Sites/Biodiversity_Protection/horizontal_project/5-Deliverables/WP3_CommunityBuilding/3-5_AnimationOfCommunity/3-5-4_ThematicSynthesisReports/Policy_Paper_WG2_PANACeA_v10_FINAL.pdf)”).
    • Filling the data gap and ensuring updated, more harmonised and exhaustive data from the fishing and the scientific community to support evidence-based decision-making at European/national and local level. Funding and financing research on Biodiversity shall be facilitated by national authorities.
    • Supporting the maintenance, development, transferability and upscaling of co-management models for natural resources in small-scale fisheries, wetlands  and  marine habitats.
    • Promoting  the  role  of  Fisheries  Local  Action  Groups  (FLAGS) to support the development of a structured dialogue among fishing stakeholders and MPA representatives, to develop a  governance system for MPAs – involving fishermen and other stakeholders in the management  committee – through  active  participation  towards   joint   decision-making (co-management structure) and co-design of management measures.
    • Build up participatory multi-stakeholder/multi-level governance to ensure the sustainable use of natural resources in the Mediterranean. Biodiversity shall be “mainstreamed” in governmental initiatives and protection and conservation measures shall be considered at the same level as societal and economic objectives.
    • Engaging all stakeholders – not only those working in Biodiversity should be involved. Local communities, the private sector, the civil society shall be engaged in the responsible use of natural resources. When local communities are given shared governance and legal rights to protect their own resources, the goals of biodiversity conservation tend to be reconciled with the needs of local communities.
    • Raising awareness production and ensuring that consumers are aware of the environmental and social benefits of buying sustainable seafood products from small-scale fishing communities (source: PHAROS4MPAs, 2019), will promote the local economy, but will also empower consumers to make informed choices.
    • In this sense, populations should be better informed on the provenance of the products they consume, as well as be made more aware about the benefits of a sound consumption from their end for the maintaining of stocks one the one hand, and their proper health on the other hand.
    • Ensuring the capacity of MPA managers to address management and monitoring activities and to be empowered to rise to the challenges entailed by the emerging blue economy.
    • Supporting transboundary governance schemes to better link regions together and address regional issues to reduce impacts on the Mediterranean ecosystems.
    • Blue economy shall be guided by environmental policies principles and application of viable solutions to maintain and protect ecosystems’ health and therefore populations’ health.
    • In terms of MSP, informed-decision making is crucial in terms of climate change, biodiversity loss, conflicts at sea. To which extend are the policymakers and ministerial planners taking into account the researchers and scientists’ communications for planning activities? This question remains essential; Biodiversity should not be compromised, thus fostering the link between science and policy is a priority action.
    • In this sense, MSP and ICZM shall include zones for coastal fisheries, for offshore aquaculture and other activities related to the fishing sector (e.g. recreational fishing), considering as well the activities performed in all shores of the Mediterranean.
    • Funding opportunities are essential for sustainable innovation investments in the blue economy sectors, which gathers many SMEs lacking the resources to adapt their infrastructures to more sustainable practices.
    • Common strategies in the Mediterranean shall be reached, including countries from all shores of the basin. The organizations and clusters – already existing in this sector in Med – shall be empowered and shall be involved in building common and co-owned strategies.
    • The efficient use of waste and by-products in fisheries & aquaculture sector is not only an environmental issue but also an economic one. More efficiency and common strategies should be commonly developed at the whole Mediterranean level.
    • Vocational education is also essential in this sector, as well as lifelong learning (e.g. in the form of living labs). It shall be implemented in coastal and insular areas where a big part of the population is involved in this activity.  Intermediterranean Commission of CPMR
  • -Integrate the circular economy into the aquaculture production approach (development of co-products);
    -Exploiting the potential of artificial intelligence in the management of production and farming;
    -Diversify aquaculture production through testing and mastering new commercial species;
    -Integrate the populations of fishermen into aquaculture activities;
    -Move towards usage savings approaches (pooling of equipment and operating infrastructures);
    -Capacity building of operators in good aquaculture practices and disease diagnosis.  National Aquaculture Development Agency
  • The impacts of activities such as oil drilling, energy installations, coastal development and construction of ports and other coastal infrastructures, dams and water flow management (especially for inland fisheries), etc. It has tremendous impacts on aquatic productivity, on habitats that sustain resources (e.g. erosion and pollution), or on the livelihoods of fishing communities (e.g. through denial of access to fishing grounds or displacement from coastal settlements). Conservation activities and the establishment of Marine Protected Areas can also impact on the livelihoods of local fishing communities.
    Climate change impacts are already visible, with modifications of the geographic distribution of species and warmer water species moving towards the poles, ocean acidification and changes in coastal conditions that affect habitat. Inland fisheries and aquaculture may face higher mortality due to heatwaves, water scarcity and competition for water.  Climate change impacts on fish-dependent populations will depend on the evolution of fishing opportunities (evolution of resources available, entitlements and capacities to fish, evolution of operational costs in production and marketing) and the evolution of prices. Impacts of extreme events are increasing, with more risks of damage or loss of infrastructure and housing. Sea level rise might lead to the relocation of communities.  Association “Forum”
  • 1. Promote and apply in the Mediterranean of the FAO Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries (EAF) and the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), as well as the obligation to maintain good environmental status in line with the respective ecological objective adopted by the Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention;
    2. Taking into account the highest level of overfishing worldwide (over 80% in the Mediterranean), Combat illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and minimize waste, by-catch and causes of discards through appropriate measures in order to restore fish stock to levels that allow the regeneration of marine ecosystems functionality and the regular replenishment of their hosted resources;
    3. Act on the commitments made under the Naples Ministerial Declaration to ensure sustainable and integrated uses of marine and coastal areas and resources, as well as circular economy and innovative tourism products and services, by identifying, sharing and investing into innovative solutions contributing to sustainable management of fisheries and aquaculture and ensuring food security. For instance, promote the use of ICZM and MSP as an effective measure/tool for decision-makers for sustainable management of fisheries and aquaculture areas;
    4. Strengthen and support data collection and the implementation of monitoring and assessment efforts of commercially exploited fish and shellfish, such as the efforts of the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (FAO-GFCM) and of the UNEP/MAP – Barcelona Convention system through the Integrated Monitoring and Assessment Programme (IMAP), in order to enable science-based fisheries and aquaculture management for the benefits of the local communities;
    5. Assess the impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture industries and on food security and supply chain in the Mediterranean, and propose adaptation measures to protect this sector and ensure its sustainability.
    6. Improve knowledge on the incidental catch of the vulnerable species and fisheries and support setting of national observation programmes/networks related to the incidental catch and stranding of the vulnerable species based on the Regional GFCM data collection protocols and the UNEP/MAP-SPA/RAC Regional Action Plans. Set a
    regional post 2020 bycatch mitigation strategy based on the SPA/BD Protocol of Barcelona Convention, GFCM recommendations, and the recent findings related to the bycatch in the Mediterranean;
    7. Science and technology: Promote the use of technology for the most selective, efficient and cost-effective fishing gears which provide the most sustainable marine resources exploitation; Widely implement and improve the use of technological tools for monitoring and tracking (VMS, Satellite tracking, etc.); Implement science-based fisheries and aquaculture management for the benefits of the local small-scale fisheries communities, and with their practical involvement;
    8. Protect the remaining most vulnerable critical areas for fishing resources through implementation and effective management of area-based management tools like marine protected areas (MPAs) through SPAMIs, no-take zones (NTZs) and temporal fishing closures through Fishery Restricted Areas (FRAs), based on both ecological and socioeconomic data;
    9. Promote and take action to implement the measures related to fisheries and aquaculture of the SCP Action Plan, e.g. Sustainable Fishing Practices, innovative technologies based on the Life Cycle Approach; quality control, traceability, standards harmonization and certification schemes; Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP) schemes, etc.  UNEP/MAP Barcelona Conception
  • Providing information about the resource origin and extraction methodology should be a must, so consumers are able to choose if they want to buy that product or not.  Underwater Gardens International
  • Policy integration.  European Environment Agency
  • “Rethinking fishing effort in a sea with high levels of environmental stress caused by pressure on fish stocks, marine pollution and population pressure.Creation of ecological safeguard zones for the main indigenous species and containment in fishing of migratory species threatened by overfishing.Creation of protective measures and further development of aquaculture, with a view to the future supply of markets, in order to create young and specialised jobs. This sector is particularly stimulating and consuming of R&D activities that university centres have been developing, and good practices in the SME and SME sector should be taken into account, with emphasis on environmental sustainability and social issues”.  CCDRAlentejo